Team members receive awards for excellence in Missouri

Team members receive awards for excellence in Missouri

Top left photo – Jennifer White (L) with Regional Mental Health Director Elizabeth Atterbury; Top right photo – Howard Fletcher (L) with Mental Health Director Trudy Stephens-Baker; Bottom photo (L-R) – Psychiatric RN Lynn Jobe, Psychiatric RN Lisa Laurence, Dr. Bruce Cornelius and Institutional Chief of Mental Health Services Greg Link

Three Corizon Health team members working in the Missouri Department of Corrections (MODOC) have been awarded the VPO (Vice President Operations) Coin for excellence in their practice. The VPO Coin is awarded to those who contribute extraordinarily to a specific initiative or consistently go above and beyond while performing their duties.

Jennifer White, Institutional Chief of Mental Health Services, and Howard Fletcher, Activity Therapist, were both awarded VPO Coins recently at Jefferson City Correctional Center (JCCC) in Jefferson City, Missouri. Ms. White received her Coin for her contribution to the creation of a suicide prevention video. The VPO Coin was given to Mr. Fletcher for his exemplary work in preparing and leading patients within the Secure Social Rehabilitation Unit (SSRU) in their graduation ceremony from the program. The SSRU is a program designed for patients who are not able to function appropriately in general population settings due to mental illness and who require higher security. Those in this program are often victims of severe assaults or have attempted suicide multiple times. We congratulate both Jennifer and Howard on this recognition and thank them for the efforts that garnered it.

A couple hours northwest, at Chillicothe Correctional Center (CCC) in Chillicothe, Missouri, Corizon Health Psychiatrist Dr. Bruce Cornelius was earning his VPO Coin by going above and beyond in expanding his onsite hours to help cover the shortfall for psychiatry coverage in the western region of our MODOC contract. He was also able to add additional sites to those in which he already practiced, not only ensuring that psychiatric services were not interrupted, but also providing collaborative services to two psychiatric advanced practice nurses (APNs) so they could continue to practice while their regular collaborators were on leave. Because of his willingness to adapt to the needs of our patients in this region, Dr. Cornelius helped guarantee that psychiatric care to patients at five separate sites went uninterrupted. We offer thanks and congratulations to Bruce for his care and dedication.